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They are now fighting an unfair battle with non-combat wounds: in addition to high risk of diabetic ulcers, veterans who survive devastating combat wounds and end up in a wheelchair are also at the greatest risk of developing non-healing pressure ulcers. We are here to help them win this battle.

ReCellTis IS A TOPICAL WOUND CARE OINTMENT TO TREAT ACUTE AND CHRONIC WOUNDS

"ReCellTis is FDA Approved."

ReCellTis REDUCES VETERAN'S AFFAIRS MEDICAL EXPENSE BECAUSE IT:

  • Heals most Stage 1 to Stage 4 wounds.
  • Reduces healing time to 1-2 months (other wound care products heal in 1 1⁄2 - 2 years, in several cases 2 - 10 years).
  • In most cases prevents amputations due to wound infections (Amputations cost approx. $45,000).
  • Heals diabetic foot ulcer wounds.
  • Heals Decubitis Ulcers (Bed Sores / Pressure Sores).
  • Drastically reduces health care cost due to bed ridden patients with bed sores.
  • Kills MRSA & Staph infections, therefore, reducing patient hospital returns.
  • Heals Cellulitis.
  • Prevents Post-Surgical wound infections.
  • Can significantly reduce wound costs to less than 25%.
  • Heals combat soldier's minor and major cuts.
  • Reduces and heals sores from patients in wheel chairs.
  • Eliminates foot and toenail fungus.
  • Prevents and heals runner's chafing.

WHICH VETERANS ARE AT RISK FOR DEVELOPING FOOT ULCERS?

A 2006 study published in the journal Diabetes Care found certain risk factors for veterans to develop foot ulcers. The risk was greater for people with:

    • An average age of 62.4 years
    • Male gender (98% of veterans with foot ulcers were male)
    • Failure of the HbA(A1C) hemoglobin test
    • Monofilament insensitivity (neuropathy)
    • Impaired vision
    • Past history of foot wounds, ulcers, or amputation
    • Athlete's foot and toenail fungus
      (a whopping 63% of veterans who required
      lower limb amputations had toenail fungus

COSTLY FACTS

  • Wound care carries a $25 billion annual price tag in the U.S. This already huge amount is projected to grow exponentially as diabetes, obesity, and old age - major risk factors for developing chronic wounds - affect more and more people each year.
  • According to the U.S> Department of Veteran Affairs, around 25 percent of military veterans have diabetes (compared to 8 percent of the adult population as a whole).
  • Diabetic limb amputation rates for patients in VA hospitals are two times higher than those in public hospitals, four times higher than in private facilities, and veterans wait four times longer to receive treatment.
  • Diabetic foot ulcers double the mortality risk. Multiple sources state that the relative five-year mortality rate after limb amputation is 68% - second only to lung cancer 86%.
  • 85% of lower limb amputations in patients with diabetes are preceded by ulceration.
  • More than 25% of veterans have been diagnosed with type II diabetes. That means 1 in 4 people receiving care at VA hospitals are being treated for the disease.
  • In fact, more Vietnam vets are receiving compensation for diabetes than for any other health issue, including post-traumatic stress disorder, hearing loss, or general wounds. Along with diabetes comes the risk of diabetic foot ulcers, which occur when pressure causes breaks in the skin and those slow-healing wounds become affected.
  • There were 70,200 lower limb amputations performed in VA facilities between 1989 and 1998, with diabetes as the top cause (63%, over $3 billion).
  • Patient's yearly care cost ranges from $20,900 to $151,700 per pressure ulcer.
  • Diabetic foot ulcer patients had $11,700 to $16,883 incremental annual healthcare costs compared with non-diabetic foot ulcer patients.
  • The average hospital treatment cost associated with stage 4 pressure ulcers was $129,248 for hospital acquired ulcers during one admission.
  • Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) cost an average of $15,000 per patient depending on the pathogen. One case of MRSA or Staph can cost $250,000 for treatment.